Blog

31
May

How to Use JavaScript to Detect Browser

Posted by | No Tags | Javascript · Resources · Uncategorized

Wouldn’t it be nice if all of our code looked the same and worked the same no matter what browser our users are viewing our projects or web pages on? That’s the dream, right? Unfortunately, cross browser compatibility isn’t something that a site can achieve without adding some extra code. There a few ways that you can use code to compensate for different browsers. You can us CSS selector browser hacks, which is a good option, especially if any changes you need to accommodate for are mostly cosmetic and can […]

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30
May

Goodbye PNaCl, Hello WebAssembly!

Posted by | | Uncategorized

Historically, running native code on the web required a browser plugin. In 2013, we introduced the PNaCl sandbox to provide a means of building safe, portable, high-performance apps without plugins. Although this worked well in Chrome, it did not provide a solution that worked seamlessly across all browsers. Since then the web community has rallied around WebAssembly, as a cross-browser solution to high performance code. WebAssembly provides the speed necessary to build an in-browser video editor or run a Unity game at a high frame rate utilizing existing standards-based web […]

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30
May

The Mindfulness of a Manual Performance Audit

Posted by | No Tags | General

As product owners or developers, we probably have a good handle on which core assets we need to make a website work. But rarely is that the whole picture. How well do we know every last thing that loads on our sites? An occasional web performance audit, done by hand, does make us aware of every last thing. What’s so great about that? Well, for starters, the process increases our mindfulness of what we are actually asking of our users. Furthermore, a bit of spreadsheet wizardry lets us shape our […]

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22
May

How to Use jQuery’s Mouse Methods

Posted by | No Tags | Javascript · Resources · Uncategorized

jQuery has 4 event methods that have to do with cursor movement. The methods are .mouseenter(), .mouseleave(), .mouseup() and .mousedown(). All of these methods can be used to trigger events and execute code based on when and where the user’s cursor moves. In terms of syntax, they’re fairly simple and straightforward to use, but they can also be really versatile and used to achieve some pretty cool functionalities and effects. In this tutorial, we’re going to go over how to use each of the mouse event methods. Take a look […]

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18
May

The Modern Mobile Web: State of the Union

Posted by | | Uncategorized

Posted by Rahul Roy-chowdhury, VP Product Management, Chrome What a difference a year makes. Last year at Google I/O, we shared that the mobile web was open for business. New technologies such as AMP and Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) were bringing new capabilities, better performance, and a streamlined workflow to the mobile web. Fast forward one year later: more than two billion AMP pages have been created and “PWA” has proved to be far more than a buzzword—it’s now the way that many businesses around the world are building for […]

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17
May

Happening now: The Mobile Web State of the Union

Posted by | | Uncategorized

Welcome to Google I/O 2017! Today at 4PM Pacific Daylight Time, Rahul Roy-chowdhury, VP Product Management for Chrome, will be on stage at Google I/O discussing The Mobile Web: State of the Union. Tune into the livestream below, and if you happen to be attending Google I/O, be sure to come to the Amphitheatre to see it live! Posted by Ryan Schoen, Product Manager Source: Chromium News Feed

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16
May

Web Maintainability Industry Survey: How Do We Maintain?

Posted by | No Tags | General

A note from the editors: As a community, we can learn so much from discovering what other developers are doing around the world. We encourage everyone to participate in this very brief survey created by Jens Oliver Meiert. Jens will share the results—and an updated guide to web maintainability based on the findings—in a few weeks. How often do we consider the maintenance and general maintainability of our websites and apps? What steps do we actively take to make and keep them maintainable? What stands in the way when we […]

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15
May

Using jQuery to Count Child Elements

Posted by | No Tags | Javascript · Resources · Uncategorized

If you ever find yourself needing to know how many child elements an HTML element has, you’re in luck, because there’s a jQuery function for that. There are actually a few different ways you can go about doing this. The first is really simple and straightforward, and will count all the children elements of an element, regardless of what type of element it is or its class or id names. To do this, we just need to use the .children() method and chain it with the .length() method, and apply […]

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